WELCOME 1755 to 1759 Pennsylvania Maps WELCOME

1755.1 A GENERAL MAP OF THE MIDDLE BRITISH COLONIES, IN AMERICA; VIZ. VIRGINIA, MARILAND, DELAWARE, PENSILVANIA, NEW-JERSEY, NEW-YORK, CONNECTICUT, AND RHODE ISLAND: OF AQUANISHUONIGY, THE COUNTRY OF THE CONFEDERATE INDIANS; COMPREHENDING AQUANISHUONIGY PROPER, THEIR PLACE OF RESIDENCE, OHIO AND TIIUXSOXRUNTIE THEIR DEER-HUNTING COUNTRIES, COUXSAXRAGE AND SKANIADARADE, THEIR BEAVER-HUNTING COUNTRIES; OF THE LAKES ERIE, ONTARIO AND CHAMPLAIN, AND OF PART OF NEW-FRANCE WHEREIN IS ALSO SHEWN THE ANTIENT AND PRESENT SEATS OF THE INDIAN NATIONS. By Lewis Evans 1755. Engraved by Jas. Turner in Philadelphia. Published according to Act of Parliament, by Lewis Evans, June 23, 1755. and sold by R. Dodsley, in Pall-Mall, London & by the Author in Philadelphia. The full title of this famous map is given here because it is the first map to treat the Indian nations as co-equal with the colonies; by comparison note the title of the Mitchell map below. Incidently, it also lists Delaware as a colony separate from Pennsylvania; something the Penns may not have liked. The map was accompanied by a pamphlet titled Geographical, Historical, Political, Philosophical and Mechanical Essays. The First Containing an Analysis of a General Map of the Middle British Colonies in America. This famous map has been discussed in many map histories and there were many subsequent copies not all listed here; see Klinefelter, Gipson, McCorkle #755.15, 756.4, 758.3, 760.3, 771.3,775.5, 776.10, Sellers & van Ee #709-716, Wheat & Brun #298-99. A discussion of various states and copies of Evans' map is also given by Stevens and Tree in Tooley, Chapter 2. The plate was modified often by a succession of publishers such as Thomas Jefferys, Sayer & Jefferys, Sayer & Bennett, Laurie & Whittle. This image is from the Library of Congress where the map can be examined in detail.
1755.2 A MAP OF THE BRITISH AND FRENCH DOMINIONS IN NORTH AMERICA WITH THE ROADS, DISTANCES, LIMITS, AND EXTENT OF THE SETTLEMENTS, HUMBLY INSCRIBED TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE, THE EARL OF HALIFAX, AND THE OTHER RIGHT HONOURABLE THE LORDS COMMISSIONERS FOR TRADE & PLANTATIONS, By their lordships most obliged and very humble servant, Jno. Mitchell, Tho: Kitchin sculp. Clerkenwell Green. Publish'd by the Author Febry 13th 1755 according to Act of Parliament and sold by And: Miller opposite Katherine Street in the Strand. This famous map has a wide literature and assumed political importance because it was much larger than competing maps, about 54 x 78 inches on 8 sheets, and consequently was used in boundary settlements. There were many subsequent copies and issues, see Sellers & van Ee #37-44, McCorkle #755.31, Fite & Freeman #47. The copy used to settle the boundary between the United States and Canada was the fourth 1775 edition, illustrated in Hayes (Map 172). This image is from the Library of Congress and most copies are sectioned through southern Pennsylvania. Note that the state extends north of 42 degrees on this map. A French edition titled AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE AVEC LES ROUTES... was published in 1776 and a 1777 printing can be seen at the Darlington Library.
1755.3 NIEUWE KAART VAN DE GROOTBRITTANNISCHE VOLKSPLANTINGEN IN NOORD AMERICA GETROKKEN WIT DE BESTE KAARTEN VAN DE MR.MITCHELL EN ANDEREN, TE AMSTERDAM by Isaak Tirion 1755. Published in Nieuwe En beknopte Hand-Atlas by Isaak Tirion, 1769 (McCorkle #755.39, #769.1; Sellers & van Ee #63). Tirion died in 1769 (Lister) so the map preparation dates circa 1755-69. According to McCorkle, although dated 1755, the map was not published until 1769. This map is a smaller Dutch version of John Mitchell's important 1755 map as the title indicates and only the left side is shown here. The notes and major place names on this map are in Dutch (i.e. meer for lake) but some places retain the original English or French names. West of the Alleghanies is considered Iroquois land as shown by the color scheme. Longitude is west from London at bottom and west from Ferro at top. Blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 130 miles. Size: 14.25 x 17.75 inches. 
  1755.4 CANADA, LOUISIANE ET TERRES ANGLOISES PAR LE SR. D'ANVILLE..., a map by D'Anville which may (or may not) have been based upon Mitchell's map (McCorkle #755.1, Sellers & van Ee #17). It shows the east coast west to the Mississippi. Later editions appear in D'Anville's Atlas General. This map was much copied, usually with credit to D'Anville, by later mapmakers. It is a large four sheet map and all four can be seen at the Darlington Library.
1755.5 NORTH AMERICA FROM THE FRENCH OF MR. D'ANVILLE IMPROVED WITH THE BACK SETTLEMENTS OF VIRGINIA AND COURSE OF OHIO, Illustrated with geographical and historical remarks. May 1755 Published according to Act by Thos. Jefferys... (McCorkle #755.2, 779.1; Sellers & van Ee #29). This map appeared in The Natural and Civil History of the French Dominions in North and South America and in Jeffreys' General Topography. It resembles the previous D'Anville map. There were many later editions with modifications, several illustrated by McCorkle and listed by Sellers & van Ee. This image is from the Library of Congress .
1755.6 A MAP OF THE BRITISH AND FRENCH SETTLEMENTS IN NORTH AMERICA:(PART THE FIRST) ..., (PART THE SECOND) CONTAINING PART OF NEW YORK, PENSILVANIA, NEW JERSEY, MARY LAND, VIRGINIA, NORTH & SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, LOUISIANA, AND ALL THE COUNTRIES..., T. Bowen, sculp. There are two separate maps and Pennsylvania is bisected at 41 degrees making it difficult to see on either one. The top map is illustrated in McCorkle #755.6. Both maps on one sheet are shown here from the National Archives of Canada. The coverage extends west to the Mississippi. Sellers & van Ee #81.
  1755.7 CARTE D'UNE PARTIE DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE POUR SERVIR A L'INTELLIGENCE DU MEMOIRE SUR LES PRETENTIONS DES ANGLOIS AU SUJET DES LIMITES A REGLER AVEC LA FRANCE DANS CETTE PARTIE DU MONDE. There are three French versions of this map (McCorkle #755.11), plus Italian (McCorkle #755.7), German (McCorkle #756.8), and Spanish (McCorkle #755.30) versions which may date somewhat later. The map shows the northeast from Newfoundland down to Chesapeake Bay and west to include Lake Erie. Its main interest is in showing the boundary between Nova Scotia and French Canada, see McCorkle for a discussion. Pennsylvania is identified, but not much else in the state.
  1755.8 CARTE DES COLONIES ANGLAISES DANS L'AMERIQUE SETENTRIONALE TERMINEE PAR LA RE. OHIO...(McCorkle #755.8), a French map of uncertain date that is a copy of Overton's 1754 map.
1755.9 CARTE DES POSSESSIONS ANGLOISES & FRANCOISES DU CONTINENT DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE. Thos. Kitchin, sculpt. Londres, 1755 (Sellers & van Ee #56, 57, 58; McCorkle #755.9, 755.22, 756.6, 759.1, 763.4). This map was apparently prepared by Thomas Kitchin in London for a French edition of Atlas methodique by Jean Palairet. There were several subsequent versions as listed by McCorkle. It shows the eastern seaboard from Newfoundland to Florida and west to the Mississippi. Pennsylvania extends to the 43rd parallel. This image is from the Library of Congress. A version dated 1756 can be seen at the Darlington Library.
  1755.10 DIE ENGLISCH = UND FRANZOSISCHEN PROVINTZEN IN NORD-AMERICA WORIN ANJETZE DER KRIEG GEFUHRET WIRD. An anonomous undated German map listed by McCorkle (#755.13) under this date. It shows the east coast from Newfoundland to Florida west to the Mississippi. It appears to have been copied from Overton's 1754 map as it shows the same weird colony boundaries.
1755.11 A NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF NORTH AMERICA, (WHEREIN THE ERRORS OF ALL PRECEDING BRITISH, FRENCH AND DUTCH MAPS RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF GREAT BRITAIN, FRANCE & SPAIN, & THE LIMITS OF EACH OF HIS MAJESTY'S PROVINCES, ARE CORRECTED.) Humbly inscribed... By his most obliged, most obedient and very humble servant, Huske. Tho: Kitchin sculpt. The map (McCorkle #755.16, Seller & van Ee #67) is from The Present State of North America by John Huske, and also appeared in a 1760 book by William Douglass. The coverage extends from Newfoundland to Florida, with an inset of the Hudson Bay area. Pennsylvania extends above 42 degrees and has an irregular western boundary that is the mirror image of the eastern. Illustrated in Fite & Freeman #48. This image is from the Library of Congress.
1755.12 CANADA ET LOUISIANE par le Sr. le Rouge ingenieur geographe du Roy a Paris rue des Augustins avec privilege du roi 1755 (McCorkle #755.23, 777.14, Sellers & van Ee #33-34, 154). This map covers the eastern United States with two insets showing the course of the Mississippi. It appeared in several Le Rouge atlases in different states. It was retitled for the 1787 edition of Francois Soules' Histoire des troubles de l'Amerique anglaises and that version is shown here. Image from the Heritage Map Museum by permission.
1755.13 A MAP OF THE BRITISH AND FRENCH SETTLEMENTS IN NORTH AMERICA. J. Lodge delin et sculp. A map showing the eastern United States from Newfoundland to Florida and west to the Mississippi illustrating the French & Indian war to readers of the Gentleman's Magazine, July 1755. This image is from the Library of Congress where there is another version very similar to this one engraved by I. Ridge, but not quite the same. It probably comes from another magazine. Pennsylvania's northern boundary extends to the 43rd parallel and the western boundary is a mirror image of the eastern. Fort du Quesne is identified, along with Logstown and Venango. The text gives a short history of discovery and colony foundation. (McCorkle #755.24, Sellers & van Ee #5). Longitude west from London, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 190 miles. Size: 11 x 15.5 inches.
1755.14 A MAP OF THE BRITISH AND FRENCH SETTLEMENTS IN NORTH AMERICA. Univ. Mag. J. Hinton Newgate Street. Another map similar to the one above illustrating the French & Indian war to readers of the Universal Magazine, October 1755 (McCorkle #755.29, Sellers & van Ee #36). Contains an inset of Crown Point. Pennsylvania is shown extending to the 43rd parallel. The coloring is likely not original. Blank verso, longitude from London. Scale: 1 inch = 192 miles. Size: 11 x 14.75 inches.
  1755.15 A MAP OF THE BRITISH AND FRENCH SETTLEMENTS IN NORTH AMERICA. T. Phinn scul. Another map similar to the ones above, but from Scots Magazine, volume 17, 1755 (McCorkle #755.33).
1755.16 MAPA DE LA AMERICA SEPTENTRIONAL divido en dos partes ... Delineado por Lopez y Cruz Ano de 1755 (McCorkle #755.25, Sellers & van Ee #35). A Spanish map of uncertain date showing the region from Newfoundland to Florida and west to the Mississippi, and containing an engraving of Niagra Falls. The English and French colonies are demarcated by a line that passes through Pennsylvania just west of the Susquehanna. Philadelphia is named. This image is from the Library of Congress.
  1755.17 CARTE ABR GEE DU CANADA LEVEE SUR LES LIEUX par M. *** resident a Quebec annee 1754. Gravee par Gautier Fils Obs. de M. Gautier annee 1755. A map published in Cartes en couleur des lieux sujets..., by J. Gautier, Paris 1756. Dated 1755 by McCorkle (#755.26) from the engraving date, it shows the St. Lawrence centered on Quebec and extends south to the Chesapeake, north to Newfoundland, and west to include Lake Erie. Delaware Bay is misshapen and the colonies are misplaced and extended north-south similar to the 1754 Overton map.
  1755.18 A MAP OF NEW ENGLAND & YE COUNTRY ADJACENT, EXTENDING NORTHWARD TO QUEBEC & WESTWARD TO NIAGRA, ON LAKE ONTARIO; SHEWING GEN: SHIRLEY AND GEN: IOHNSON'S ROUTS, & MANY PLACES OMITTED IN OTHER MAPS; COMMUNICATED BY A GENTLEMAN WHO RESIDED IN THESE PARTS. Engrav'd for the General Magazine of Arts & Sciences for W. Owen at Temple Bar 1755. This General Magazine map is interesting for its inset engravings of three forts, Oswego, Crown Point, and especially Fort Du Quesne. This fort is shown with four bastions at ninety degrees and a fifth pointing inland between "Ohio River" (i.e. Allegheny) and "Monongehela R." Locations around the fort are numbered with an accompanying explanation table. The rest of the map shows nothing of Pennsylvania except the lower Delaware with Philadelphia named. The map can be seen at the Darlington Library. McCorkle #755.27; Sellers & van Ee #64.
1755.19 THEATRUM BELLI IN AMERICA SEPTENTRIONALI II. foliis comprehensum jussu Acad. Reg. Scient. et Eleg. Litt. exhibit J. C. Rhode ac: geogr. Berger sulpsit Berol. This undated two sheet German map is dated 1755 by McCorkle (#755.34) and Sellers and van Ee (#59) because it was probably published to illustrate the French & Indian War. It resembles a map (1753.5) published in Atlas Geographique omnes orbis terrarum regiones... by Leonhard Euler, for the Royal Prussian Academy of Sciences , Berlin 1753, and may have come from a later edition. It covers the area east of the Mississippi from Canada to Carolina. The eastern sheet is illustrated in McCorkle and has a fancy cartouche with a palm tree and an engraving of Crown Point; the western part is illustrated in Brown #23. Both sheets joined are shown here from the Library of Congress.
1755.20 PARTIE DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE, QUI COMPREND LE COURS DE L'OHIO, LA NLLE. ANGLETERRE, LA NLLE YORK, LE NEW JERSEY LA PENSYLVANIE, LE MARYLAND AND LA VIRGINIE, LA CAROLINE. par le Sr. Robert de Vaugondy, Geographe Ordinaire du Roi avec privilege 1755. M. C. Haussard fecit. This map (McCorkle #755.37, Sellers and van Ee #718) appeared in editions of de Vaugondy's Atlas Universel from 1757 on. It is a large map of the eastern seaboard with an inset of the South Carolina coast on the same scale. The mapping of the trans-Allegheny and Great Lakes regions and in the interior of New England includes information from the Mitchell, Evans and Fry-Jefferson maps. The boundary between the British colonies and Louisiane follows along the Appalachians and the map contains a combination of English and French names. The title cartouche fills the Atlantic. The Pennsylvania region is shown here in a closeup . Blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 45 miles. Size: 19 x 25 inches.
1755.21 PARTIE DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENT. QUI COMPREND LA NOUVELLE FRANCE OU LE CANADA, Par le Sr. Robert de Vaugondy Geog. Ordinaire du Roy. Avec privilege 1755. M. C. Haussard fecit. This map also comes from Atlas Universel and is only included here because an inset of the Great Lakes includes part of northern Pennsylvania, not named. English versions were published in 1759 PART OF NORTH AMERICA; CONTAINING CANADA...; and in 1766 A NEW MAP OF CANADA, ALSO THE NORTH PARTS... (McCorkle #759.3). This image is from the Library of Congress.
1755.22 PARTIE OCCIDENTALE DE LA NOUVELLE FRANCE OU CANADA. Par Mr. Bellin Ingenieur de la Marine 1755. This is a map of the Great Lakes which includes all of Pennsylvania. This image is from the National Archives of Canada. This map is illustrated in Schwartz (1994). It was copied (with credit) by Homann Heirs and published with exactly the same title circa 1755, and this version can be seen at the Darlington Library.
1755.23 A NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF THE ENGLISH EMPIRE IN NORTH AMERICA: representing their rightful claim as confirm'd by charters and the formal surrender of their Indian friends, likewise the encroachments of the French, with several forts they have unjustly created therein. By a Society of Anti-Gallicans. Publish'd according to Act of Parliament Decr. 1755 and sold by Wm. Herbert on London Bridge & Robt. Sayer over against Fetter Lane in Fleet Street (McCorkle #755.38, Sellers & van Ee #28). Like many other maps from this period, this one shows the east coast from Newfoundland to Florida and west to the Mississippi; a large inset map adds northern Canada and the Caribbean. This image is from the Library of Congress. There was at least one other version of this map which included six additional insets of Crown Point and Canadian locations which is illustrated in Schwartz (1994) and included here from the Library of Congess copy .
1755.24 PLAN OF FORT LE QUESNE built by the French at the Fork of the Ohio and Monongahela in 1754. There are three versions of this map. The first is a manuscript draft prepared by Robert Stobo probably in 1754 (illustrated in Brown #26 and in Schwartz (1994) and shown here in a later reprint). The first printed version was "Published according to the Act by J. Payne in Pater-noster row July 15 1755," as listed by Stevens & Tree (#70) in Tooley, Chapter 2; this map is illustrated in Swift (2001) and in Pritchard & Taliaferro #24. The second printed version has the imprint "Printed for Robt. Sayer and Thos. Jefferys," and is illustrated in Brown #27, Schwartz (1994) and Johnson (1974). The fort was four pointed with two additional breastworks toward the landward side, and was located very near the river juncture. The image here is from Jeffrey's A general topography of North America and the West Indies published in 1768, from the Library of Congress. The printed copies are very similar.
  1755.25 A DRAFT OF THE OHIO FROM AN INDIAN ACCOUNT. This is a manuscript map showing the region from Cumberland to Lake Erie and west into Ohio. Both Brown #22 and Schwartz (1994) date it circa 1755. It was found in the papers of General Thomas Gage and the original is in the Clements Library at the University of Michigan. This is probably the map listed in Docktor #255C1, #255C1.01.
1755.26 A PLAN OF FORT DEQUESNE. A manuscript map dated circa 1755 in Brown #28. It has letters on parts of the fort with an accompanying identification table. The layout resembles that by Stobo, map 1755.24. The map is reproduced in Hulbert(1907) which is the image here.
1755.27 A SKETCH OF THE FIELD OF BATTLE WITH THE DISPOSITION OF THE TROOPS IN THE BEGINNING OF THE ENGAGEMENT OF THE 9TH JULY ON THE MONONGAHELA. 7 miles from Fort Du Quesne. This is a manuscript map in the Library of Congress showing the battle along the river near Pittsburgh where General Braddock was fatally shot. Washington was Braddock's aide during the march and retreat. Braddock died during the retreat and his body was buried in an unmarked grave so the Indians could not find it. The map is discussed and illustrated in Brown #29 and Schwartz (1994). The image here is from Winsor (1884).
  1755.28 THE DRAUGHT OF GENL. BRADDOCKS ROUTE TOWARDS FORT DU QUESNE as deliver'd to Capt. McKeller Engineer. By Christ. Gist The 15th. of Sept. 1755. This is a manuscript map of the region from Cumberland to the Forks of the Ohio. The original is in the John Carter Brown Library and it is illustrated in Brown #30 and Schwartz (1994). The map has a series of numbers for the camps each night and an accompanying milage table. A similar map formed the basis for subsequent maps of Braddock's march such as map 1759.2. Gist was one of the famous characters of the colonial frontier and a neighbor of the more famous Daniel Boone. Gist acted as guide for Washington on his 1753 trip to negotiate with the French, or more accurately to order them off Virginia land.
1755.29 COPY OF A SKETCH OF THE MONONGAHELA, WITH THE FIELD OF BATTLE, DONE BY AN INDIAN. This is a manuscript map in the Library of Congress dated circa 1755 showing the battle near Pittsburgh where General Braddock was fatally wounded.
1755.30 MAP OF ROUTE FROM FORT CUMBERLAND...TO FORT ERIE, an anonymous manuscript map reproduced in Hulbert(1907) dated circa 1755, which resembles Washington's map of his 1753 journey to visit the French. There are a number of anonymous manuscript maps showing this route, see Docktor #2__A4, #25_A4.01, #25_W4, #255A8, #258A8.
  1755.31 A MAP OF PART OF THE PROVINCE OF PENNSYLVANIA WEST OF THE RIVER SUSQUAHANNAH. A manuscript map in the Public Record Office, London, showing the region between the Susquehanna and the Allegheny Front with this date on it in pencil. This map is illustrated and discussed in Myers (1999). A facsimile copy can be seen at the Darlington Library dated circa 1756.
  1755.32 NAZARETH TRACT WITH THE ADJACENT LANDS, a manuscript map online at the Bethelehem Digital History Project and dated 1755. It is a land ownership map of the Nazereth, Pennsylvania region.
  1755.33 FAIT AU FORT DUQUESNE LE 15 AVILLE 1755. This French manuscript map (Stotz II-22) was prepared by Canadian military engineer Joseph-Gaspard Chaussegros de Lery in April 1755 as the title says. The original is at the Centre des Archives d'outre-mer, Aix-en-Provence, Archives Nationales. It differs somewhat from the Stobo map above. The bastion facing the river apex is unfinished, and the external redoubts are farther from the basic square with one facing north and a larger one facing east. The five interior buildings are larger relative to the overall size of the fort. The Ohio-Allegheny is called "Oyo ou Belle Riviere" and the Mon "Riviere Manangaile." To the left is text with the title: PLAN DU FORT DUQUESNE ET DE LES ENVIRONS. The fort plan cast in a 4 foot diameter bronze disk and planted at the actual fort location in Point State Park, Pittsburgh, resembles this map. This marker bears the inscription "from the contemporary military drawing in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris," which may refer to the map below.
  1755.34 PLAN DU FORT DUQUESNE. This very polished manuscript plan (Stotz II-19) of uncertain date shows the fort as complete and is therefore less believable than the Lery plan above. Only the fort is shown and little of the surrounding topography. A table with a letter key identifies buildings. Stotz attributes the plan to Francois Le Mercier, a French engineer, and says it is the only extant description of the buildings inside the fort. The original is in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris.
  1755.35 NEW WORKS AT FORT DU QUESNE AT JUNCTION OF ALLEGHENY & MONONGAHELA RIVERS. This interesting manuscript map is discussed in detail by Stotz (II-60). It was a plan for a new fort to replace Fort Duquesne carried by General Braddock. It has a note in French "Found in the military portfolio of General Braddock..., Dumas, Capt." Apparently Braddock's plans were found by French Captain Jean Dumas after the battle and sent on to Canada. The plan shows a large fort covering the entire point between the rivers. The original is in the Huntington Library in California. Docktor #255G6.
  1755.36 (Kittanning) This manuscript map was found under #33 in the map archives of the American Philosophical Society attributed to (Major) John Armstrong, circa 1755. It is a proposal for an attack on Kittanning, the Indian town on the Allegheny, by Armstrong, based upon a report by "John Baker Soldier at Fort Shierley, who last Winter made his escape from the Indians at the Kittanning." The attack was made in conjunction with Forbes' advance on Pittsburgh and the town destroyed. Armstrong County is named after the major and Kittanning is today the county seat.
  1755.37 (Fayette County) There is a manuscript map in the Christopher Gist papers in the Maryland Hall of Records showing the area around Gist's homestead, presumably prepared by Gist circa 1755. Docktor #255G5.
  1755.38 A SKETCH OF THE FIELD OF BATTLE OF THE 9TH OF JULY, UPON THE MONONGAHELA, SEVEN MILES FROM FORT DU QUESNE, BETWEEN THE BRITISH TROOPS COMMANDED BY GENERAL BRADDOCK AND THE FRENCH & FRENCH INDIANS COMMANDED BY MONS. DE LE PIERRE, by Patrick Mackellar, 1755. A manuscript map in the Royal Library collections of King George III at Winsor Castle. Docktor #255M5.03.
1755.39 A MAP OF THE FIVE GREAT LAKES WITH PART OF PENSILVANIA, NEW YORK, CANADA AND HUDSONS BAY TERRITORIES &c., from the September 1755 issue of The London Magazine: Or, Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer, London: Printed for R. Baldwin, at the Rose in Pater-Noster Row. The area covered extends south from James Bay to 40 degrees, west to include the upper Mississippi, and includes almost all of Pennsylvania which is shown extending north to 43 degrees. A few months earlier in July the magazine published A MAP OF VIRGINIA, NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, MARYLAND WITH PART OF NEW JERSEY &c., which extends north to just past 40 degrees and includes the thin slice of southern Pennsylvania missing on this map. Longitude west from London, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 107 miles. Size: 8 x 10 inches.
1756.1 A MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF PENSILVANIA DRAWN FROM THE BEFT AUTHORITIES, by T. Kitchin Gr., printed for R. Baldwin in Pater Noster Row 1756. This map appeared in the December issue of London Magazine 1756. It is based upon the 1749 Evans map and incorporates the 1732 boundary agreement between Lord Baltimore and the Penns, which set the boundary at essentially its present position. The boundary with New York is placed at about 42d 30m and called undefined. The western boundary is a mirror image of the eastern and is placed just west of "F. du Quesne." Kitchin apparently read accounts of western Pennsylvania as Ohiopyle Falls on the Youghiogheney River are identified. This is the first map of all the state of Pennsylvania itself, rather than the Philadelphia or Mid-Atlantic regions. It pre-dates the larger and better known 1759 Scull map of Pennsylvania by three years. Phillips page 673. Longitude from Philadelphia at top, London at bottom. Blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 43 miles. Size: 7 x 9 inches. 
1756.2 AMERICA SEPTENTRIONALIS A DOMINO D'ANVILLE IN GALLIIS EDITA NUMC IN ANGLIA COLONIIS IN INTERIOREM VIRGINIAM DEDUCTIS NEC NON FLUVII OHIO CURSU AUCTA NOTISQ GEOGRAPHICIS ET HISTORICIS ILLUSTRATA. Sumptibus Homannianorum Heredum Noribergae Ao. 1756 (McCorkle #756.1, 777.2; Sellers & van Ee #68-69). Like so many of the 1755 maps, this one shows the eastern United States from Newfoundland to Florida and west to the Mississippi, and is modeled on the 1755 d'Anville map as the title makes clear. The map appears in editions of Homann Heirs atlases. Pennsylvania extends to 42d 30m with an irregular western boundary that is a mirror image of the eastern boundary. The German text describes British and French claims and is taken from Jeffrey's 1755 map (see map 1755.5). Blank verso, with longitude west from Ferro at top and west from London at bottom. Scale: 1 inch = 100 miles. Size: 18 x 20 inches.
  1756.3 A MAP OF NORTH AMERICA SHEWING THE PLACES WHERE THE METALS, MINERALS, FOSSILES AND MEDICINAL-WATERS ARE TO BE FOUND. B. Cole sculp. This map (McCorkle #756.3) by Benjamin Cole appeared in the Literary Magazine, December 1756. It is an English copy of the French 1752.3 map of Philippe Buache.
1756.4 A MAP OF THE EASTERN PART OF THE PROVINCE OF NEW YORK; WITH PART OF NEW JERSEY &C. Drawn from the best authorities. By T. Kitchin geog. Printed for R. Baldwin in Pater Noster Row 1756. This map (McCorkle #756.7) appeared in the London Magazine, September 1756, which also carried the companion Pennsylvania map above, 1756.1. The northern and eastern parts of Pennsylvania are included on this map only because the boundary is set at 42d 30m with the note "not yet settled." There is an inset of Crown Point. The towns of Durham, Bethlehem, Easton, Nazereth near the Lehigh - Delaware junction are named. Blank verso, longitude from Philadelphia at top, from London at bottom. Scale: 1 inch = 47 miles. Size: 6.5 x 8.5 inches.
  1756.5 MAPA DE LA PRINCIPAL PARTE DE LA AMERICA SEPTENTRIONAL. A Spanish map (McCorkle #756.10) that appeared in Atlas o Compendio Geographico, Madrid 1756. It shows the eastern United States west to beyond the Mississippi. The colonies are named with inaccurate boundaries.
1756.6 CARTE DU CANADA ET DE LA LOUISIANE QUI FORMENT LA NOUVELLE FRANCE ET DES COLONIES ANGLOISES OU SONT REPRESENTEZ LES PAYS CONTESTEZ DRESSEE SUR LES OBSERVATIONS ET SUR PLUSIEURS CARTES PARTICULIERES ET MEME ANGLOISES par J. B. Nolin geographe. a Paris chez Daumont rue de la Feronerie, a l'Aigle d'Or, 1756 (McCorkle #756.12, Sellers & van Ee #72). The map shows the eastern United States, McCorkle illustrates the northeast portion. The colony names are placed in an elongated north-south position, but boundaries are not indicated. Chester and Philadelphia are named and a "Fort Indien" along the Susquehanna. This image is from the Library of Congress.
1756.7 CARTE DES COLONIES ANGLAISES DANS L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE, TERMINEE PAR LA RE. OHIO. Traduite de l'Anglais de la carte de H. Overton, et augmentee par le Sr. Nolin 1756. As the title states, this map is based upon the Overton 1755 map with additions from a Nolin map for the Nova Scotia area. It also contains the various boundary indications that appeared on the 1755.7 map described above. McCorkle #756.13. This image is from the Library of Congress. The Maryland State Archives, MSA SC 1399-1-122, lists a map of very similar title: CARTE DES COLONIES ANGLOISES DANS L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE TERMINEE PAR LA Re. OHIO, A Paris chez N.J.B. Poilly Rue S. Jacques a L'Esperance. This map has the same geographical coverage but is thought to date earlier, circa 1754-55.
1756.8 CARTE DES POSSESSIONS FRANCOISES ET ANGLOISES DANS LE CANADA, ET PARTIE DE LA LOUISIANE. A Paris, ches le Sieur Longchamps, geographe, rue Saint Jacques, a l'Enseigne de la Place des Victoires. C.P.R. 1756. The image shown here is a later version from Louis Charles Desnos' Atlas général 1767 per the Library of Congress from where this image comes. The map includes an inset titled "Supplement pour les possessions françoises et angloises au sud de la Louisiane. Gravé par Chambon," which is a map of the southeast. The region from Newfoundland to the Carolinas and west to include the Great Lakes is shown on the main map. The colonies are depicted with elongated north-south boundaries, with Pennsylvania ending at the Allegheny Front. McCorkle #756.9, 776.18; Seller & van Ee #70, 140.
1756.9 AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE avec les routes, distances en miles, limites et etablissements Francois et Anglois. Par le Docteur Mitchel traduit de l'Anglois a Paris par le Rouge Ingr. Geographe du Roy rue des Grands Augustins 1756. This is the Le Rouge French edition of Mitchell's map, which appeared in subsequent atlases and editions. McCorkle #756.11, 776.22, 777.15; Sellers & van Ee #45-53. This image is from the Library of Congress.
1756.10 A GENERAL MAP OF THE MIDDLE BRITISH COLONIES IN AMERICA: VIZ. VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, DELAWARE, PENSILVANIA... carefully copied from the original publish'd at Philadelphia, by Mr. Lewis Evans 1755, with some improvements by I. Gibson. Sold by T. Kitchin Engraver & Printseller at the Star opposite Ely Gate Holborn. 1756. Price 2s. This is a copy of Evans' famous 1755 map and is sometimes called a piracy, however Evans is given full credit in the title though he probably got no part of the 2 shillings. This map appeared in several versions, the last apparently in 1794 where it is titled A NEW AND GENERAL MAP OF THE MIDDLE DOMINIONS BELONGING TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIZ:... THE DELAWARE COUNTIES, PENNSYLVANIA... and sold by Laurie & Whittle; this later version is shown here. The map also can be seen at the Darlington Library. McCorkle #756.4, 794.6. Blank verso; longitude from Philadelphia at top, from London at bottom. Scale: 1 inch = 34 miles. Size: 19 x 26 inches.
  1756.11 A SKETCH OF THE PROVINCES OF NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY, PENSILVANIA, MARYLAND & VIRGINIA shewing the line of forts lately built on the frontiers of those colonies and their scituation with respect to the french forts on the Ohio & Lake Erie. Also the route from Albany to Oswego with the forts built & to be for its security. Drawn by order of His Excellency General Shirley, by Wm. Alexander secretary. This is a manuscript map of the region from Lake Ontario to Lake Erie and south to include the Chesapeake. The forts are numbered and identified in a table. The original is in the British Library; it is illustrated in Brown #31 and dated to 1756; and a facsimile copy can also be see at the Darlington Library.
1756.12 FORT AUGUSTA. An anonymous manuscript map of the fort constructed at Sunbury at the fork of the Susquehanna. It is reproduced in Hulbert(1907), which is the image here, dated 1756 and in Stotz II-40. Hulbert and Stotz also reproduce an elevation view of the fort construction.
1756.13 CARTE DE LA PENSILVANIE, from Etat present de la Pensilvanie... by William Smith, Paris 1756, an abridged translation of William Smith's A brief view of the conduct of Pennsylvania, for the year 1755, ... London, 1756. To this the translator, the Abbé J.I. de La Ville, added a Description abrégée de la Pensilvanie and a Relation contentant la suite de ce qui s'est passé en Pensilvanie ... , as well as this map. The English version had no map. In 1768 this same map was used in Histoire naturelle et politique de la Pensylvanie, et de l'etablissement des Quakers dans cette contree, traduite de l'Allemand by Jacques Philibert Rousselot de Sugy, Ganeau, Paris 1768. See Phillips pages 674, 673. Longitude west from Paris, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 26 miles. Size: 10 x 7.5 inches.
  1756.14 PENNSYLVANIA (showing Frontier Defenses, 1756) from Philadelphia up the Delaware, Schuylkill and Susquehanna Rivers. A manuscript map in the Pennsylvania Archives, Simonetti #115, and probably the map discussed by Myers (1999) and attributed to Thomas Hutchins. Also, probably the map listed by Docktor #256A3. It is illustrated on pages 176-177 in Shirk. It shows southeastern Pennsylvania west to the mountains with little detail; the intent is to show the location of the frontier forts.
  1756.15 ESSAY DU COURS DE L'OYO avec les Forts Francois et Anglois, tire de la Carte Angloise de Washington 1755. a Paris chez le Rouge rue des Augustins. This is a French copy of map 1754.7 that appeared in Washington's Journal and is dated 1756 in Pritchard & Taliaferro #31 where it is illustrated with discussion. Several towns and Indian tribes along the Allegheny and Ohio are named.
  1756.16 THE BRITISH & FRENCH DOMINIONS IN NORTH AMERICA, Particularly Shewing the French Encroachments Through all the British Plantations from Nova Scotia down to the Gulf of Mexico. Printed for T. Bowles in St. Paul's Church Yard and John Bowles and son at the Black Horse in Cornhil. McCorkle #756.2 dates this map circa 1756. There is a copy in the Pennsylvania Archives, Manuscript Group 11 #940, dated circa 1758.
  1756.17 PLAN DU FORT AUGUSTA. This manuscript plan (Stotz II-42) of the fort is more polished than the one listed above and attributed to Lieutenant Elias Meyer, a colonial soldier, who was apparently French. See also Docktor #256M4.01, 256M4.02.
  1756.18 (Fort Augusta) A manuscript map in the collections of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania attributed to Joseph Shippen, and dated circa 1756. The catalog title is MAP OF COL. CLAPSHAM'S MARCH TO FORT AUGUSTA. The map shows the Susquehanna from Harrisburg to Sunbury to Nanticoke. Docktor #256C2.
  1756.19 A MAPP OF PENSILVANIA IN AMERICA, an anonymous manuscript map in the British Library dated circa 1756 that is a copy of Thomas Holme's 1687 map. Docktor #256H5, #256A5.
1756.20 DIEFE LAND CARTE ENTBALTDEN ABRIS DER LAGE DER ENGLIFCPEN DROPINZEN IN NORD AMERICA. This anonymous and undated map is believed to come from a German almanac printed during the last half of the eighteenth century when there was a large German population entering Pennsylvania. The latest date in the text on the verso is 1756 so that date is used here, but it must date somewhat later. The descriptor "United States" does not appear suggesting a date prior to 1780. If so, this would be one of the few maps printed in the colonies. The region depicted is that of the French & Indian War. The land is drawn to look three dimensional and the map pictures rivers, lakes, including four of the Great Lakes: Ontario, Erie, a distorted Huron, and the lower part of Superior. The locations of Montreal, Quebec, Lake Champlain, Crown Pt, Philadelphia, Ft Frontenac, are noted though hard to see on this print. No longitude markings, scale at top indicating ~150 miles to the inch. Size: 4.75 x 7 inches.
1757.1 CARTE DE LA NOUVELLE ANGLETERRE, NOUVELLE YORCK ET PENSILVANIE, POUR SERVIR A L'HISTOIRE GENERALE DES VOYAGES, ECHELLE DE LIEUES COMMUNES DE FRANCE, 1757 TOM.XIV, NO. 9. par M. B. Ing de la Mar. This map includes eastern Pennsylvania along with New York and New England as the title says. The Delaware separation from Pennsylvania is not shown. This map is illustrated on page 244 of Portinaro & Knirsch attributed to Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Although bearing the date 1757, the map was likely published sometime later in Histoire General des Voyages...., edited by Antoine Francois Prevost, Paris 1757-c1770. Sellers & van Ee (#721-723) say it appears in La Harpe, Abrege de l'histoire generale des voyages as late as 1780. There were many copies of this map, not all listed here, and McCorkle (#757.1, 763.2, 777.4, 781.2, 783.2) illustrates five of them. The German version of this map was titled KARTE VON NEU ENGLAND NEU YORCK UND PENSILVANIEN and first appeared (with the attribution von M. B. Ing de la Mar) in Allgemeine Historie der Reisen zu Wasser und Lande, a multi-volume history by J. J. Schwabe, Leipzig, Arkstee und Merkus 1758. There is a companion map CARTE DE LA VIRGINIE, DE LA BAYE CHESAPRACK... which includes a piece of southeastern Pennsylvania. Longitude is west from Paris. Blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 56 miles. Size: 10 x 14.4 inches. 
1757.2 AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE, SUIVANT LES NOUVELLES DECOUVERTES, AUGMENTE DES COLLONIES QUI SONT DERRIERE LA VIRGINIE ET DU COUR DE L'OHIO. Traduit de l'Anglois d'apres Thos. Gefferys geographe du Prince de Galle, et divisee suivant les pretendues pretentions des Anglois, sans neantmoins entendre, que ce la tire a concequence en 1757. The map (McCorkle #757.3, Sellers & van Ee #73) covers the eastern United States from Canada to the Gulf. There is an inset of the Atlantic Ocean. Pennsylvania extends above 42 degrees with an irregular western boundary which is the mirror image of the eastern. There was a 1777 version of this map with the title altered to CARTE NOUVELLE DES POSSISSIONS ANGLOISES EN AMERIQUE... (McCorkle 777.10, Sellers & van Ee #155-56). This image is from the Library of Congress.
  1757.3 A MAP OF THAT PART OF AMERICA WHICH WAS THE PRINCIPAL SEAT OF WAR IN 1756. A timely magazine map (McCorkle #757.4, Sellers & van Ee #78) from the Gentleman's Magazine of February, 1757, showing the area from Pennsylvania to the St. Lawrence. The state just barely makes it onto the bottom of this map and only because its boundary is carried to the 43rd parallel. But, why doesn't "the principal seat" include the Forks of the Ohio? The map can be seen at the Darlington Library.
  1757.4 A NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF THE PRESENT WAR IN NORTH AMERICA. Universal Mag. J. Hinton, Newgate Street. R. W. Seale sculp. This map (McCorkle #757.5, Sellers & van Ee #79) from the Universal Magazine of May, 1757, looks almost exactly like the preceding one from Gentleman's Magazine. Again, Pennsylvania just makes it onto the bottom because its boundary is shown near 43 degrees.
1757.5 A MAP OF MARYLAND WITH THE DELAWARE COUNTIES AND THE SOUTHERN PART OF NEW JERSEY &C. By T. Kitchin Geogr. Pennsylvania is part of the "&c" in this map, which appeared in the August issue of London Magazine 1757, although a good bit of it is shown west to Ohiopyle Falls. Washington's battle with the French and Indians at Fort Necessity is marked with crossed swords. Towns, roads, rivers, boundaries are shown. The map is pretty good on boundaries considering the Mason-Dixon survey was still in the future. The coloring on this copy is not original; illustrated in Papenfuse & Coale. Longitude west from Philadelphia at top, from London at bottom. Blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 38 miles. Size: 6.5 x 9 inches.
1757.6 CARTE DE LA FLORIDE, DE LA LOUISIANE, et Pays Voisms. Pour servir a l'Histoire Generale des Voyages par M. B. Ing. de la Marine 1757. Tom XIV. in 4O. No. 12 Tome 14. in 8O page 1ere. A map by Jacques Nicolas Bellin, the coverage extends from Lake Erie to the Rocky Mountains and from the Great Lakes to a cutoff Florida. F. Duquene, Joncaire Poste Fr, Venango, F. de la Aux Baeufs, F. Neccessite det, are named in western Pennsylvania. This map follows De L'Isle map of the region, showing settlements, towns, Indian tribes, forts, rivers, mountains and other early place names. The map appeared in the atlas to accompany Prevost's Histoire Generale des Voyages, Paris 1746-89. Exactly the same map was also published under the title CARTE DE LA LOUISIANE... . The German version of this map is titled KARTE VON LUISIANA, DEM LAUFE DES MISSISSIPI UN DEN BENACHBARTEN LAENDERN, see map 1757.1 above for source. Longitude west from Paris, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 150 miles. Size: 9 x 12 inches.
1757.7 CARTE DES LACS DU CANADA Pour fervir a l'Histoire Generale des Voyages Par M. B. Ing. de la Mar 1757. This is another Bellin map from Voyages. It has the same name as map 1744.3, also by Bellin, but is not the same map. The coverage is broader and it lacks many of the names on the earlier map. Pennsylvania is not named although "F. de la R. aux Baeufs" on French Creek is named. This map is illustrated in Portinaro & Knirsch. There is also a German version KARTE VON DEN SEEN IN CANADA, see map 1757.1 above for source. Longitude west from Paris, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 106 miles. Size: 7.75 by 11 inches.
1757.8 CARTE DE LA VIRGINIE, DE LA BAYE CHESAPEACK, et Pays Voisins. This is another Bellin map from Voyages. Exactly the same map also appeared under the name CARTE DE LA BAYE DE CHESAPEACK et Pays Voisins; as with most of Bellin's maps, there seem to be several versions of this one. This example is taken from the circa 1780 re-issue of Histoire générale des voyages but is identical to the earlier map. The coverage extends north to 40d 25m and so includes a slice of southern Pennsylvania. The map extends west to just beyond "F. Cumberland." The towns identified in Pennsylvania are Sipensbourg (i.e. Shippensburg), Lancastre, Yorc (i.e. York), Chester, Derbi (i.e. Darby), Bristol, and Philadelphie. Longitude west from Paris, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 36 miles. Size: 7.5 x 11.25 inches.
1757.9 CARTE DE LA LOUISIANE COLONIE FRANCAISE avec le Cours du Fleuve St. Louis, les Riviers Adjacentes, les Nations des Naturels, les Establissems Francais, et les Mines. This is a map of the midwest by Le Page. Image from the Heritage Map Museum by permission.
1757.10 CARTE DES FRONTIERES FRANCOISES ET ANGLOISES DANS LE CANADA DEPUIS MONTREAL JUSQUES AU FORT DUQUESNE. This French map was prepared by Pierre Pouchot, commandant of Fort Niagara, sometime circa 1755-60. However, it was first published in his memoires: Mémoires sur la dernière guerre de l'Amérique Septentrionale : entre la France et l'Angleterre ; suivis d'observations, dont plusieurs sont relatives au théatre actuel de la guerre, & de nouveaux détails sur les moeurs & les usages des sauvages, avec des cartes topographiques par m. Pouchot. Yverdon 1781. As the title says, it shows the region between Montreal and Fort Duquesne (Pittsburgh) including all of New York and New Jersey, and most of Pennsylvania. This image is a mid-19th century facsimile, probably from O'Callaghan.
  1757.11 MILITARY SKETCH FROM PHILADELPHIA TO FORT DU QUESNE. This manuscript map (Stotz I-5) shows almost the entire southern half of the state. It is of uncertain date but probably made between the Braddock (1755) and Forbes (1758) expeditions. Some early western settlements are named such as Forts Littleton and Loudon, and Frankstown.
  1757.12 A DRAUGHT OF THE WEST BRANCH OF SUSQUEHANNA & PART OF THE OHIO RIVER, 26 January 1757. This manuscript map was found under #45 in the map archives of the American Philosophical Society attributed to Joseph Shippen, Jr. It is the earliest of five maps in the Society collections attributed to Shippen while serving under Colonel Joseph Burd during the French & Indian War.
  1757.13 PLANS & SECTIONS OF HOUSES FOR OFFICERS & BARRACKS FOR SOLDIERS NEAR THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, Benjamin Loxley, 1757. A manuscript map in the British Library showing a small section of riverfront Philadelphia. Docktor #257L7.
1758.1 MR. ARMSTRONG'S ROUGH DRAFT OF THE COUNTRY TO THE WEST OF THE SUSQUEHANNA. This map is reproduced in Brown #32, and also Schwartz (1994), and the original manuscript image is from the Library of Congress. There were two Mr. Armstrongs, brothers George and John. This map is usually attributed to Major George Armstrong due to a long ago note made on the back of it and some correspondence between John Armstrong and Governor William Denny. A number of manuscript maps of western Pennsylvania were produced during the 1750's because of the fighting against the French. Maps assumed to be by William Alexander, George and John Armstrong, and Thomas Hutchins from this era are discussed by Myers (1999) with reproductions, who questions the dating (more likely 1756) and maker of this map. There is a second, and less detailed, manuscript version of this map also illustrated by Myers (1999). The Susquehanna River is at right, the Juniata River in the center, and a dotted line leads to Fort Duquesne. This name dates the map prior to 1759, it is dated 1755? in Sellers & van Ee (#1303).
  1758.2 MAPPA DELL' AMERICA SETTENTRIONALE ove sono rappresentati esattam. i paesi e loro limiti controversi che hanno dato motivo alla guerra presente fra la Francia e l'Inghilterra. An Italian map (attributed to Bellin by McCorkle #758.1) showing the eastern United States and the geography of the French and Indian War to Italian viewers. Some of the names appearing in Pennsylvania are "Filadelfia," "Venango," "LogsTown," "Kuskuskies," "F. del Quesne."
  1758.3 A NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF THE ENGLISH EMPIRE IN NORTH AMERICA representing their rightful claim as confirm'd by charters, & the formal surrender of their Indian friends; likewise the encroachments of the French, with the several forts they have unjustly erected therein. By R. Bennett engraver. This map (McCorkle #758.2) appeared in the Grand Magazine of Universal Intelligence, vol. 1, 1758. As per usual, it shows the eastern United States from Newfoundland to Florida and west to beyond the Mississippi. "Ft. du Quesne" is undoubtedly one "unjustly erected." This map has the same title and looks much like the map from the Society of Anti-Gallicans, 1755.23.
1758.4 NEW YORK AND PENSILVANIA. No. 41 from Emmanuel Bowen's Atlas Minimus Illustratus..., drawn and engraved by J. Gibson, London 1758. On the map is written a general description of the size and products of the two states. Bowen has used 43 degrees as the northern Pennsylvania boundary. The Lakes Ontario, Erie, Huron and Michigan are accurately delineated. Towns identified in Pennsylvania include: Philadelphia, Ft. du Quesne, Kuskies, Tuscaro and Baccaloo. Sandusky in Ohio is shown on Lake Erie. There is an elaborate title cartouche. The Atlas Minimus was issued in 1758, 1774, 1779, and 1792; the image here is from the 1792 edition and is identical to the original. Bowen died in 1767 and Gibson in 1787. It was also published by Mathew Carey in Philadelphia in 1798. There is another map from the same volume titled PENSILVANIA, MARYLAND AND VIRGINIA. Longitude west from London, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 250 miles. Size: 3.25 x 3.75 inches.
1758.5 CANADA OR NEW FRANCE. A map by John Gibson that appeared in editions of Emanuel Bowen's Atlas Minimus, London 1758, 1774, 1779, 1792 (McCorkle #758.4). It is a small, rather crude map of the Great Lakes area; nothing in Pennsylvania is named. In the 1792 version, "English Settlements" is replaced by "United States." Pennsylvania is shown extending to the 43rd parallel with the western boundary a mirror image of the eastern. Longitude west from London, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 385 miles. Size: 2.5 x 3.75 inches.
1758.6 THE ENGLISH AND FRENCH SETTLEMENTS IN NTH. AMERICA. Another small map by John Gibson in Atlas Minimus (McCorkle #758.5). This one shows the entire eastern United States from Newfoundland to Florida with the colonies named. Philadelphia is one of the few towns named and Pennsylvania's northern boundary appears to extend to Lake Ontario. Like the map above, this one appeared in subsequent editions with slight modifications. The color on this copy is a later addition. Longitude west from London, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 600 miles. Size: 2.5 x 3.75 inches.
  1758.7 A MAP OF THE BRITISH AND FRENCH SETTLEMENTS IN NORTH AMERICA. I. Ridge scu. Another timely magazine map from Gentleman's & London Magazine, October 1758 (McCorkle #758.8, Sellers & van Ee #60). It shows the eastern half of North America from Hudson Bay to the Gulf, and includes a list of French forts.
1758.8 ROUGH PLAN OF FORT DU QUESNE, such as it was, before it was demolish'd. 1758. J.C. Pleydell. The original of this manuscript map, of which there are two copies, is in the British Library and it is illustrated in Brown #33 and in Hulbert(1907) which is the image here. Pleydell was a military engineer or draftsman attached to the army of General John Forbes and his map shows the fort nearer the rivers than other views. Brown and Stotz show the later version of this map with the title PLAN OF FORT DU QUESNE, NOW PITSBURGH..., which is a more finished drawing than the sketch here and likely made in 1759.
1758.9 A PLAN OF THE FORT FOR 220 MEN BUILT IN DECEMBER 1758 WITHIN 400 YARDS OF FORT DU QUESNE. This is a manuscript map in the British Library and illustrated in Brown #35, Stotz II-57, and Hulbert(1907), which is the image here. It was prepared by an engineer attached to the troop of Colonel Hugh Mercer who was left in command at (now) Pittsburgh. Since Fort Duquesne had been demolished, a temporary fort, subsequently called Mercer's Fort, was built along the bank of the Monongahela. This fort was gradually demolished as Fort Pitt was built.
  1758.10 (Western Pennsylvania) An untitled anonymous manuscript map of the Allegheny & Monongahela River region with approaches to Fort Pitt; listed in Phillips page 673 and possibly one of the other manuscript maps listed here circa 1760. There are a number of anonymous manuscript maps either prepared separately by soldiers in Braddock's army, or copied from one original, that show the route from Cumberland to Pittsburgh, see Docktor #259A4.0A, #260A1.
  1758.11 GENERAL FORBES MARCHING JOURNAL TO THE OHIO, by John Potts. This is a manuscript map illustrated and discussed in some detail by Myers (1998) and given this date, though early 1759 is possible. It shows the road built by Forbes on his approach to Fort Duquesne, subsequently Pittsburgh. This is probably the manuscript map in the Library of Congress dated 1763? in Sellers & van Ee (#1304) and titled MAP OF A ROUTE THROUGH SOUTH WEST PENNSYLVANIA FROM FORT LOUDOUN, FRANKLIN CO. TO FORT PITT, PITTSBURGH. Also listed in Phillips page 673 dated 176_ . Also see Docktor #258A4.01, #258W5.
  1758.12 BETHLEHEM, a manuscript map online at the Bethlehem Digital History Project and dated 1758. It shows, in German, early Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
  1758.13 BRUNDRIFS DES VON DER MARY BURNSIDES, a manuscript map online at the Bethlehem Digital History Project and dated 1758. It is a surveyed land map in German.
  1758.14 (Moravian Settlements) This is a bird's-eye-view manuscript map online at the Bethlehem Digital History Project and dated 1758. The map is untitled but has a long caption in German at the bottom.
  1758.15 PLAN OF FORT DU QUESNE BEFORE IT WAS DESTROYED 1758, from The Grand Magazine of Magazines, London. This short lived periodical was apparently published between July 1758 and June 1760, and the map dates from a later edition than the date in the title as General John Forbes did not occupy the area until late November, 1758. The map contains the note "Fort du Quesne destroyed 1758 now called Pittsburg;" also shown are Braddock's Fields, where General Braddock was mortally wounded, and "the Redoubt," a fortification located further upstream along the Allegheny. This map is roughly contemporaneous with item 1759.6 below, and might also have some claim to being "the first map of Pittsburgh;" however, the name does not appear in the title. This map was seen at auction. There are two manuscript maps in the British Library that may be the basis for this map. see Docktor #258G7, #258P5.
  1758.16 (Juniata Crossing, near Everett) This untitled and undated manuscript map is attributed to Captain Harry Gordon (Stotz II-48) and dated to June, 1758. The Juniata Crossing was located about fourteen miles below Bedford on the Raystown Branch, and built to secure the river crossing on the way to Bedford. It shows a stockade on both sides of the river extending down to the banks.
  1758.17 PLAN OF THE ENVIRONS, FORT, AND ENCAMPMENTS OF RAYSTOWN. This beautiful manuscript map (Stotz II-51) is attributed to the British engineer J. C. Pleydell. It dates prior to December, 1758, since after that the fort was renamed Bedford by General Forbes. It includes an area of several miles showing the river and mountains by hatching.
  1758.18 (Fort Ligonier) This rough untitled manuscript map (Stotz III-2) was prepared by Colonel James Burd and is thought to be the earliest map of the fort. It shows Loyalhanna Creek and the general topography by hatching. This map and the next four are illustrated by Stotz who discusses their use in the modern reconstruction of Fort Ligonier.
1758.19 ROUGH PLAN OF FORT LIGONIER. Despite the title, this manuscript map (Stotz III-3) was prepared by a professional. It accompanies the map below. The reproduction in Hulbert(1907) is shown here.
1758.20 PLAN OF FORT LIGONIER WITH PART OF THE RETRANCHMENT. An anonymous manuscript map (Stotz III-4) also reproduced in Hulbert(1907) which is the image here.
  1758.21 PLAN OF THE RETRENCH'D CAMP AT FORT LIGONIER. This manuscript map (Stotz III-5) is credited to Richard Dudgeon. It is similar to the "rough plan" above but with more detail. The originals of this map and the one below are in the Royal Library, Windsor Castle.
  1758.22 PLAN OF THE RETRENCH'D CAMP AT FORT LIGONIER 1758. This manuscript map (Stotz III-6) is attributed to J. C. Pleydell and differs from the one of similar title above. It has more detail and north is professionally oriented at the top.
  1758.23 DRAUGHT OF PART OF THE RIVER SUSQUEHANNA, by Joseph Shippen January 1758. This manuscript map was found under #45 in the map archives of the American Philosophical Society attributed to Joseph Shippen, Jr. It is the second of five maps in the Society collections attributed to Shippen while serving under Colonel Joseph Burd during the French & Indian War.
  1758.24 (Bedford County) An anonymous and undated manuscript map in the British Library showing a junction of the Juniata River. Docktor #258A5.
1758.25 A MAP OF THAT PART OF AMERICA, THAT IS NOW THE SEAT OF WAR, FROM QUEBECK TO FORT DUQUESNE, COMPREHENDING THE ENGLISH SETTLEMENT, ON THE SEA COAST. This undated and anonymous map is believed to be by Thomas Kitchin and published in the November 1758 issue of the Grand Magazine of Magazines. Fort Duquesne is named and the word "now" used, indicating it was made before 1759. An odd orientation for the Eastern part of North America, with northeast to the right, Lakes Erie and Ontario to the top of the sheet, running south to Cape Cod and Chesapeake Bay. The coast from James Town to Maine is shown. Lake Erie is placed too far east, names and shows the locations of various forts. Longitude west from London, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 100 miles. Size: 4.5 x 8 inches.
1758.26 PENNSILVANIA, MARYLAND AND VIRGINIA, page 42 from Atlas Minimus Illustratus: containing fifty-two pocket maps of the world, drawn and engraved by J. Gibson; revised, corrected, and improved, by E. Bowen, Geographer to His Majesty. To which are added a description of the several empires, kingdoms, states, and provinces, of the known world; their seas, harbours, rivers, and mountains: with a concise account of the air, soil, and climate of each; and the government, customs, religion, and manners of the inhabitants. Published by T. Carnan and F. Newbery, London, 1774. The Atlas Minimus Illustratus was issued in 1758, 1774-9, and 1792. Bowen died in 1767 and Gibson in 1787. It was also published by Mathew Carey in Philadelphia in 1798. This version is identical to the original 1758 version. See maps 1758.4, 5, 6 above. Longitude west from London. Blank verso. Scale:1 inch ~ 350 miles. Size: 2.5 x 3.75 inches.
1759.1 TO THE HONORABLE THOMAS PENN AND RICHARD PENN, ESQURS., TRUE & ABSOLUTE PROPRIETARIES & GOVERNOURS OF THE PROVINCE OF PENNSYLVANIA & COUNTIES OF NEW-CASTLE, KENT & SUSSEX ON DELAWARE THIS MAP OF THE IMPROVED PART OF THE PROVINCE OF PENNSYLVANIA. Is humbly dedicated by Nicholas Scull. Engraved by Jas. Turner and Printed by John Davis for the author. Published... Jan. 1st 1759. & Sold by the author, Nicholas Scull, in Second Street Philadelphia. This is one of the most famous maps of the state and sometimes considered the first to present all of the state itself, but it only extends west to just past the Allegheny Front and north to the Wyoming Valley. It also appeared as several plates in A general topography of North America and the West Indies. Being a collection of all the maps, charts, plans, and particular surveys, that have been published of that part of the world, either in Europe or America by Thomas Jeffreys published in 1768, which is the composite image here from the Library of Congress. This map was improved and published in 1770 by Nicholas' grandson, William. For more on the Scull family, see Cummings, H. M., Docktor (1995), and Scull, G. D. Sellers & van Ee #1294, Phillips page 673, Wheat & Brun #422-23.
1759.2 MAP OF THE COUNTRY BETWEEN WILLS CREEK AND FORT DUQUESNE, from The Grand Magazine of Universal Intelligence and Monthly Chronicle of Our Times, January 1759, London: R. Griffiths & J. Hoey. This map is based upon a drawing by Capt. Robert Orme, an aide-de-camp to General Braddock, showing the march to the French Fort Duquesne (Pittsburgh) in 1755 that ended in disaster. It includes southwestern Pennsylvania, northern Virginia and western Maryland. Wills Creek is at Cumberland, Maryland, and the Virginians built a fort there that was the jumping off point for expeditions to the west. Numbers along the route of march refer to encampments and appear in a table on a larger scale version which was eventually published in Thomas Jeffrey's A General Topography of North America and the West Indies (1768), along with several others made by Orme. Those maps are illustrated in Swift and also in Schwartz (1994), see map 1768.7. The map has a cartouche with a hanging vine and a compass rose. Longitude is west from Philadelphia, unusual for a map published in England, and indicates the map was possibly prepared in America. The original manuscripts of Orme's maps are in the British Library and the Library of Congress has photocopies, see Docktor #255O6.01. Blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 17 miles. Size: 8 x 5 inches. 
1759.3 CARTE DES POSSISSIONS ANGLOISES & FRANCOISES DU CONTINENT DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE ... revised and improved by J. Rocque...1759 (McCorkle #759.1). This is a revised version of the French map prepared by Kitchen, 1755.9, and has the English title along the top A MAP OF THE BRITISH AND FRENCH DOMINIONS IN NORTH AMERICA... . Rocque is best known for his maps of colonial forts. This image is from the Library of Congress.
1759.4 PART OF NORTH AMERICA; COMPREHENDING THE COURSE OF THE OHIO, NEW ENGLAND, NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY, PENSILVANIA, MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, CAROLINA AND GEORGIA. From the Dr. Robert, with improvements. This map (McCorkle #759.2) is a smaller English version of the de Vaugondy map, 1755.20. It appeared in the New Geographical Dictionary by John Barrow, London 1759-60. Longitude west from London, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 105 miles. Size: 8.5 x 11.5 inches.
  1759.5 A NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF THE PRESENT SEAT OF WAR IN NORTH AMERICA. Engraved for the Royal Magazine. G. Rollos sculp. This map (McCorkle #759.4, Sellers & van Ee #85) looks very much like the previous magazine maps (1757.3,4) of similar title. Again Pennsylvania appears on the bottom of the map only because its boundary is set at the 43rd parallel.
1759.6 FORT DU QUESNE, NOW PITTSBURGH, AND ITS ENVIRONS, from the January, 1759, issue of The Scots Magazine. This woodcut map has sometimes been called the "first map of Pittsburgh," since General Forbes' army seized control of the Forks of the Ohio and renamed it "Pittsburgh" in November, 1758. Apparently, within three months, a horseman got to Philadelphia and a ship from there reached London. The map identifies several sites as given by the number key at the bottom, and is accompanied by a short article with extracts from the letters of General Forbes. An untitled version appeared in the London Magazine of January 1759 as noted in Wheat & Brun #421. It also appeared in Poor Roger, 1760, and in Father Abraham's Almanac, 1761, which is the image shown here from a reproduction in Winsor. In these later versions the key differs somewhat as follows: 1) Monongahela River, 2) Fort Duquesne, or Pittsburgh, 3) the small fort (closer to the Forks), 4) Allegheny River, 5) Indian town, 6) Shanapins town, 7) Youghiogheney River, 8) Ohio River, 9) Logs town, 10) Beaver Creek (or River), 11) Kuskaskies (identified as chief town of the Six Nations), 12) Shingoes town, 13) Alleguippes (apparently an Indian town), 14) Sennakaas (another Indian town), 15) Tuttle (i.e. Turtle) Creek, 16) Pine Creek. The small fort 3) may refer to Fort Prince George, constructed by a small force of Virginians under command of Captain William Trent in 1754, while 2) refers to the French Fort Duquesne. Another possibility is that the small fort is Mercer's Fort, constructed to house troops between the destruction of Fort Duquesne and the building of Fort Pitt. Scale: 1 inch = 20 miles. Size: 4 x 4 inches.
  1759.7 A MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF PENNSYLVANIA intended chiefly to illustrate the account of the several Indian purchases made by the proprietors of the said province, the claims made by the Indians. T. Jeffreys sculp. This map appears in An enquiry into the causes of the alienation of the Delaware and Shawanese Indians from the British interest by Charles Thomas, London 1759. Phillips page 673.
  1759.8 A PLAN OF THE NEW FORT AT PITTSBURGH. Novr. 1759. G. Wright fecit. This manuscript map is the first record of the new fort to be called Fort Pitt, not even started when this map was made. The original is in the British Library and it is illustrated in Brown #36. A later facsimile copy can be seen at the Darlington Library. This map subsequently appeared in A Set of Plans and Forts in America by John Rocque, London 1763, Sellers & van Ee #1331. There is an anonymous manuscript map in the British Library with the handwritten title PLAN OF PITTSBURGH 20TH JANRY, dated 1758 but which must refer to 1760, see Docktor #258A2, also #259A5.02.
  1759.9 A PLAN OF FORT DUQUENSE NOW CALL'D PITTSBURGH. An anonymous manuscript map of uncertain date probably prepared by a soldier in Forbes' army. It is not strictly accurate as one landward bastion present on other views is not shown and the drawing is somewhat crude. The original is found in Norris family documents at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and it is illustrated in Brown #34 and dated circa 1759. This may be the map listed in Docktor #2__H5.
1759.10 A CHART OF LAKE ERIE WITH ROUTE SOUTHWARD. This is an anonymous manuscript map reproduced in Hulbert(1907) showing the Allegheny River down to Fort Pitt. It is dated 1756? in Hulbert, but since Fort Pitt is named the date must be 1759 or later. Only the bottom half covering Pennsylvania is shown here. This is probably the same map listed in Docktor #25_A5.01, .02.
1759.11 A MAP OF THAT PART OF AMERICA, THAT IS NOW THE SEAT OF WAR, FROM QUEBECK TO FORT DUQUESNE, COMPREHENDING THE ENGLISH SETTLEMENT, ON THE SEA COAST. This undated and anonymous map is thought to be by Thomas Kitchin, and from the London Magazine circa 1760. Since it names Fort Duquesne and includes the word "now" in reference to the French & Indian War, it must date to the latter 1750's, possibly as early as 1757. It has an odd northwest-southeast orientation with Lakes Erie and Ontario to the top of the sheet and displaced too far east. The coastline from Maine to Virginia is shown with names and locations of various towns. Almost all of Pennsylvania is included with many of the French & Indian War era forts and towns named. Longitude west from London, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 100 miles. Size: 4.5 x 8 inches.
  1759.12 (Fort Le Boeuf on French Creek) This is an untitled and undated manuscript drawing of the fort layout (Stotz II-13) attributed to Thomas Hutchins, who made a journey from Pittsburgh to Presque Isle and prepared sketches of the French forts. This one was built in 1753.
  1759.13 (Fort Machault at Franklin) This is another untitled and undated manuscript French fort map by Hutchins; Stotz (II-16) illustrates a facsimile. The French built this fort on the Allegheny between Forts Le Boeuf and Duquesne in 1755. The first French fort built in western Pennsylvania was at Presque Isle, constructed in 1753, but no contemporary sketch of this fort survives. The French thus built four forts in Pennsylvania between Presque Isle and Pittsburgh.
  1759.14 DRAUGHT OF THE SITUATION OF FORT BURD ON THE MONONGAHELA Laid out by J. S. jr. & built by a Detachment of Pennsylvanians under the Command of Colo. Jas. Burd in October 1759. The J. S. was apparently Joseph Shippen, an engineer. This small manuscript map (Stotz II-36) shows the river, Dunlap's Creek, and the bluff on which the fort was put. The location is in present day Brownsville, about a mile from another well known frontier site, Redstone.
1759.15 (Bedford) An untitled and anonymous manuscript map of Fort Bedford reproduced in Hulbert(1907) which is the image here. The date is uncertain. Stotz (II-50) attributes the map to Pleydell and says that Forbes did not name the fort until December, 1758; prior to that the location was known as Ray's Town or Raystown. There are other manuscript maps of forts at Carlisle, Shippensburg, and Littleton in the British Library that may have been prepared by the same draftsman; see Docktor #25_A5.03 - .07.
  1759.16 ROUGH DRAUGHT OF THE MONONGAHELA RIVER FROM FORT BURD TO THE CONFLUENCE OF MUDDY & CHEAT RIVERS, taken by J. Shippen, Jr., November 1759. This manuscript map was found under #45 in the map archives of the American Philosophical Society attributed to Joseph Shippen, Jr. It is the third of five maps in the Society collections attributed to Shippen while serving under Colonel Joseph Burd during the French & Indian War. Fort Burd was near present day Brownsville and the Cheat River is at the Pennsylvania and West Virginia border. This map was likely prepared in conjunction with map 1759.14 above.
  1759.17 (Lititz) This manuscript map of Lititz, a town north of Lancaster, has been seen for sale as a reproduction dated 1759. The title is in German Gothic script and is indecipherable except for "von Litiz." Underneath in script is "Jacob Huber," apparently the maker. Lititz was settled by Moravians and many of the original buildings can be seen today including the large church.
1759.18 MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF PENSILVANIA. This anonymous map appears opposite page 129 in the March 1759 issue of The Grand Magazine of Magazines, or Universal Register, London: printed for T. Kinnersly, in St. Paul’s Church Yard. It accompanies an article titled 'The present state of Indian affairs in North America.' This short lived periodical was only printed over two years, 1758-59. It included book reviews, military and naval news and maps related to the war with France, a chronology of events, and monthly summaries of stock prices. Intaglio printed maps and illustrations were bound in the pages. This is the second map of Pennsylvania (after map 1756.1) to show the entire state. Scale: 1 inch = 65 miles. Size: 4.25 x 7.5 inches.
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